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  • williams-sisters-pushy-parents

    Pushy parents are often lambasted by both traditional and social media channels. This post will offer kudos to those parents who will stop at nothing to get the best for their children.

    The majority of people who oppose pushy parents would agree that it is the notion of making a child do something that they don't like doing that they disagree with. It's the belief that if a child is unhappy doing something, then they shouldn't be doing it. I disagree, below I list 5 reasons why a pushy parent is a good parent.

    • "I don't want to...". In life we all have to do things that we oppose. Whether it's taking out the bins or worse, going to work every day. I don't believe that not wanting to, is good enough reason not to do something. The benefits of taking the bins out are that your house will stay clean & odour free. The plus side to not enjoying work is at least being in employment and it's financial compensation.
    • Give it a try. I don't do heights, but I will always try my hardest to conquer this fear in the name of being able to say, I did it. Whether I enjoyed the experience or not, I can say take pride in saying, "I gave it a try and I did/ didn't like it."
    • A sense of achievement. Although naysayers will argue that children will simply rebel, being introduced to a subject and guided through how it works, eventually leaves a child feeling a sense of fulfilment. Often in life the biggest hurdle is making a start. Breaking down a task into bite-sized chunks will make a task more manageable and easier to achieve.
    • Become a success. Look at the Williams sisters. Their father installed a tough work ethic into them, with many citing that they were "bred to play tennis". Whether you agree or disagree with their fathers tactics, it is certainly reaping it's reward now.
    • Nature needs to be nurtured. Ok, so raw talent is something that can't be bought, but it needs to be nurtured. In my opinion, it's worse to waste talent than to have never had it in the first place. Without desire to succeed, even the most gifted child will end up lost amongst the crowd.

    In conclusion, it is imperative that our children are encouraged to succeed. Whether your child needs a little more help with their verbal reasoning skills or numeracy ability, it must be noted that we are not being pushy parents, we are simply guiding them towards a grammar school education and a ultimately better life.

    Do you agree with this post? Or do you take a more laissez faire approach to parenting, I'd love to hear your thoughts.

    Photo courtesy of bsmith101.wordpress.com

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  • I thought I’d take a moment to go through one of the questions from our verbal reasoning practice tests. This kind of question is popular in the 11+ exam and can get you tied up in knots if you’re not familiar with it. It’s also a question that can eat up a lot of time if you’re not used to this style, so here’s an technique you can use to solve this one relatively easily.

    Here’s the question:

    Karen is older than Daniel, but younger than Jacob. Angela is younger than Carl who is younger than Jacob. Angela is older than Karen.

    Who is the youngest?

    Please circle the correct answer.

    A) Karen              B) Daniel              C) Angela            D) Jacob               E) Carl

    The key trick to this is to use a timeline. Imagine it like this:

    Youngest

    -

    -

    -

    Oldest

     

    Start filling it in according to the clues you are given. Treat each clue as an individual fact. When you complete it, leave plenty of space around each name to allow them to shuffle around!

    Karen is older than Daniel, but younger than Jacob.

    So to translate this in to a less tricky sentence, Daniel is younger than Karen, and Karen is younger than Jacob. This gives us:

    Youngest

    -

    -

    -

    Oldest

    Daniel

     

    Karen

     

    Jacob

     

    Angela is younger than Carl who is younger than Jacob.

    OK, so Angela is the youngest in this sentence, with Jacob still at the top of our diagram. We’re not sure where Karen fits into this so be prepared to move her around:

    Youngest

    -

    -

    -

    Oldest

    Daniel

    Karen

    Angela

    Carl

    Jacob

     

    Angela is older than Karen.

    This sentence confirms that where we’ve placed Angela in relation to Karen is correct. Therefore the answer to “who is the youngest?” is B) Daniel.

    So in summary, when you see questions like this in a test:

    • Imagine a timeline
    • Take each clue one at a time
    • Leave space to shuffle people around
    • And as a bonus timesaver, if all the names start with a different letter, use that initial rather than writing the name out in full.

    You can find this question and more like it in our library of Verbal Reasoning Practice Tests.

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